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Resources

Purchase Eat Well & Keep Moving, Third Edition or contact your K-12 representative for a price quote. Special pricing is available for bulk purchases.

Websites

The following websites offer school officials, teachers, food service staff, parents, and students additional information on the main topics of the Eat Well & Keep Moving program. These websites are operated by the federal government, state governments, and nonprofit groups that health professionals consider to be reputable organizations. Eat Well & Keep Moving cannot vouch for the accuracy or completeness of the information contained on these sites. The mention of a website here does not mean that Eat Well & Keep Moving, the Harvard Prevention Research Center, or the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Heath endorses these organizations or their positions.

  • American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) Breakfast
    AICR is a nonprofit organization that sponsors research on diet and cancer. Its website offers healthy breakfast recipes that feature whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

  • New Hampshire Department of Education and Department of Health and Human Services 5 A Day Quantity Recipe Cookbook
    This cookbook offers quantity- and family-size recipes, including breakfast recipes, featuring fruits and vegetables. The quantity recipes use USDA commodity foods and are kid tested.

  • Project Bread Let’s Prepare Healthy School Breakfast
    Project Bread aims to end hunger in children. This guide seeks to improve the nutrition content of breakfasts in schools. It includes menus, guidelines, product lists, and recipes.

  • American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) Healthy Recipes
    AICR is a nonprofit organization that sponsors research on diet and cancer. Its website offers recipes that feature whole grains, fruits, and vegetables.

  • Cooking with Kids An elementary school curriculum that teaches children about nutrition through cooking and food tasting lessons.

  • Chop Chop A nonprofit organization and magazine whose mission is to inspire and teach kids to cook real food with their families.

  • Food, Fun, & Family Tools to help families adopt healthy standards for their homes.

  • Team Nutrition, USDA Healthy Meals Resource System (HMRS): Cooking with Kids
    Offering training and technical assistance to food service personnel who work in USDA child nutrition programs, the HMRS website includes recipes, food safety information, and a database of education and training materials for school nutrition staff.

  • The Edible Schoolyard This organic gardening and cooking program lets students experience food production and preparation from seed to table.

  • The Food Studies Institute A multicultural curriculum that uses all the senses to instruct children about food and nutrition. The website also offers tips for initiating a food-based teaching program in schools as well as tips for teachers.

  • The Nutrition Center Food Adventures Program
    Children learn basic cooking skills and nutrition concepts while also learning about food science, math, and cultural heritage from around the globe.

  • The Nutrition Source, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Home Cooking
    Maintained by the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, these recipes are consistent with the Eat Well & Keep Moving principles of healthy living.

  • Project Bread Let’s Cook Healthy School Meals Cookbook
    Project Bread aims to end hunger in children. This guide seeks to improve the nutrition content of meals in schools. It includes menus, guidelines, product lists, and recipes.

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food and Nutrition Service What’s Cooking? USDA Mixing Bowl
    This website offers quantity-size and family-size recipes as well as tips for cooking at home and with children.

  • American Cancer Society ACS Guidelines for Eating Well and Being Active
    The American Cancer Society website offers guidelines for healthy eating and physical activity, covering both individual and community actions that may help prevent cancer.

  • American Diabetes Association (ADA) Nutrition and Recipes
    The ADA website offers nutrition information and recipes for people with diabetes; materials on the ADA website include a guide to making healthy food choices and a guide to eating out.

  • American Heart Association (AHA) Diet and Nutrition The AHA website provides heart-healthy diet and lifestyle recommendations as well as recipes and shopping tips.

  • American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR) AICR is a nonprofit organization that sponsors research on diet and cancer. Its website contains information on the link between diet and cancer and the ways to reduce cancer risk. AICR also offers a nutrition hotline staffed by registered dietitians.

  • Center for Children’s Health Media, the Nemours Foundation KidsHealth
    KidsHealth, a website focused on the health of children and teenagers, has nutrition and fitness information for children, Teenagers, and Parents.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention BAM! Body and Mind
    The BAM! website for children aged 9 through 13 provides information on nutrition and other health topics.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Nutrition Topics
    This website links to several CDC nutrition–related resources, including tips for healthy eating, healthy weight maintenance, breast-feeding, and improved bone health.

  • Center for Science in the Public Interest (CSPI) Smart Mouth
    The Smart Mouth website, CSPI’s nutrition website for children and teenagers, features fun facts about food and the food industry as well as nutrition-related games, recipes, and articles.

  • Department of Health and Human Services and U.S. Department of Agriculture The Dietary Guidelines for Americans
    The Dietary Guidelines for Americans advises people aged 2 years and older about how good dietary habits can promote health and reduce the risk for major chronic diseases.

  • Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity (HPRC) HPRC works with community partners to design, implement, and evaluate programs that improve nutrition and physical activity and reduce overweight and chronic disease risk among children and youth.

  • National Heart Lung and Blood Institute (NHLBI) Portion Distortion
    The Portion Distortion quiz graphically illustrates the supersizing of food portion sizes over the past 20 years. The site also offers a downloadable serving size information card to help people remember what a standard serving of food looks like.

  • Nutrition Detectives, Yale University School of Medicine A program for elementary school children that provides clues on reading food labels and detecting marketing deceptions while learning to identify and choose healthful foods.

  • The Nutrition Source, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Maintained by the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health, The Nutrition Source provides timely, evidence-based information on diet and nutrition for clinicians, allied health professionals, and the public.

  • Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services GirlsHealth
    The GirlsHealth website for girls aged 10 to 16 has information on nutrition, fitness, and other health topics. The site also has a section for parents and caregivers and a section with classroom materials.

  • Public Broadcasting Service PBS Learning Media
    The PBS Learning Media website has more than 3,000 free lesson plans and activities that teachers can download, including nutrition and fitness lesson plans for all grade levels

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) Food and Nutrition Information Center
    The Food and Nutrition Information Center has information on many nutrition topics such as diet and disease, food labeling, food composition, food safety, healthy weight, and obesity. The site includes links to diet assessment tools and a database of the calories and nutrients found in foods.

  • We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) We Can! is a federal program that gives parents and caregivers tools for promoting healthy weight in children. The We Can! website offers suggestions for healthy eating, including the guide to GO, SLOW, and WHOA foods for making healthy choices.

  • American Heart Association (AHA) Healthy Habits Start at Home
    The AHA’s website offers hints on how parents can help their children develop healthy habits, limit television viewing, and handle a picky eater.

  • Food, Fun, & Family Tools to help families adopt healthy standards for their homes.

  • Harvard Prevention Research Center Tools for the Home
    Tools to help parents limit screen time and adopt other healthy behaviors at home.

  • KidsHealth, The Nemours Foundation KidsHealth for Parents
    KidsHealth is focused on the health of children and teenagers. This section includes nutrition and fitness information for parents.

  • American Council on Exercise (ACE) Youth Fitness
    ACE is a nonprofit organization that certifies fitness and health professionals. Its website offers health and fitness tips, an exercise library, and a fitness curriculum for upper-elementary students (Operation Fit Kids).

  • American Heart Association (AHA) Physical Activity
    The AHA’s website offers tips for increasing daily physical activity. It also offers Just Move, an online tool to help people begin or continue an exercise program, and Choose to Move, a free physical activity program for women.

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Physical Activity
    This website provides information on why physical activity is important, how much physical activity is needed every day, and how to overcome barriers to exercise. It also includes links to related programs, such as Healthy Youth!

  • Harvard Prevention Research Center on Nutrition and Physical Activity (HPRC) HPRC works with community partners to design, implement, and evaluate programs that improve nutrition and physical activity and that reduce overweight and chronic disease risk among children and youth.

  • American Cancer Society Get Active
    The American Cancer Society website offers tips for being active, including advice on how to get children to be more active and how to create a more active community.

  • National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) State-Level School Health Policy Database
    This website lists state-level school health policies that promote physical education.

  • National Center for Safe Routes to School Safe Routes to School programs aim to make it safer and easier for children to walk and bike to school. This website offers information on Safe Routes to School programs from around the country, advice on starting a Safe Routes to School program, case studies, legislative and funding information, and links to training resources.

  • Weight-Control Information Network (WIN) Active at Any Size!
    WIN is an information service of the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK), National Institutes of Health (NIH). It provides science-based information on obesity, weight control, physical activity, and related nutrition issues. This website offers information that encourages physical activity among overweight and obese people, addressing many of the challenges overweight and obese people may face.

  • The Nutrition Source, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health Staying Active
    The Nutrition Source is a website maintained by the Department of Nutrition at the Harvard School of Public Health. The Nutrition Source has an article on the benefits of exercise and tips for incorporating more exercise into daily life.

  • Office on Women’s Health, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services GirlsHealth
    The GirlsHealth website for girls aged 10 to 16 has information on nutrition, fitness, and other health topics. The site also has a section for parents and caregivers and a section with classroom materials.

  • Public Broadcasting Service PBS Learning Media
    The PBS Learning Media website has more than 3,000 free lesson plans and activities that teachers can download, including nutrition and fitness lesson plans for all grade levels.

  • SHAPE America: Society of Health and Physical Educators SHAPE America is a nonprofit professional membership association of physical education teachers and other physical activity professionals. Its website offers guidelines on activity for children and sells physical activity publications, brochures, and curricula.

  • University of Illinois at Chicago, Department of Disability and Human Development National Center on Physical Activity and Disability (NCPAD)
    NCPAD’s website offers extensive information on developing fitness and physical activity programs for people with disabilities.

  • U.S. Department of Agriculture Choose MyPlate.Gov
    The USDA’s MyPlate food guidance system provides information on nutrition and physical activity for adults and children.

  • U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports President’s Challenge
    The President’s Council on Physical Fitness and Sports created the President’s Challenge, a program that encourages all Americans to make being active part of their everyday lives. This website provides details on the President’s Challenge, including a list of sports and challenges for various age groups.

  • WalkBoston Walking for Health and the Environment Curriculum
    WalkBoston, a nonprofit group that launched a Safe Routes to School program in the Boston area, has developed a walking curriculum for grades K through 5. Its website also has a Safe Routes to School tool kit with step-by-step guidance for organizing a Safe Routes to School program.

  • We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) Make Family Time Active Time
    We Can! is a federal program that gives parents and caregivers tools for promoting healthy weight in children. The We Can! website offers suggestions for ways to make family time active time.

  • Action for Healthy Kids Resources to Improve Schools
    Action for Healthy Kids is a nonprofit group that works through schools to improve the health of overweight, undernourished, and sedentary youths. Its website lists resources that address many areas of the school food and physical activity environment, including à la carte foods, physical education, and advertising and marketing in schools.

  • Alliance for a Healthier Generation For Schools
    The Alliance for a Healthier Generation is a partnership between the American Heart Association and the William J. Clinton Foundation that fights child obesity. The alliance’s Healthy Schools Program helps schools improve school foods and physical activity and also support staff wellness.

  • Kids’ Safe and Healthful Foods Project The Kids' Safe and Healthful Foods Project, a collaboration between the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation and the Pew Charitable Trusts, provides nonpartisan analysis and evidence-based recommendations on policies that affect the safety and healthfulness of school foods.

  • New Hampshire Department of Education Healthy School Nutrition Environment
    This assessment tool, which is based on the USDA’s Changing the Scene program and the CDC’s Comprehensive School Health Assessment, can be used to assess and develop action plans for six key elements of a healthy school nutrition environment.

  • National Association of State Boards of Education (NASBE) State-Level School Health Policies
    This website lists state-level school health policies in several areas such as physical education and physical activity, nutrition education, school food services, and the school food environment.

  • The Robert Wood Johnson Foundation Healthy Schools for Healthy Kids
    This report highlights ways for schools to increase children’s physical activity and to improve their diets, identifying promising policies and programs in schools and districts around the country.

  • Team Nutrition: Changing the Scene Scene Improving the School Nutrition Environment
    The USDA’s Team Nutrition works through schools to promote the nutritional health of children in the United States. Changing the Scene is a tool kit for improving the school nutrition environment, covering topics such as meal quality, cafeteria environment, healthy food choices, and nutrition education.

  • School Wellness Policy Nutrition and Physical Activity: Local School Wellness Policy Resources
    The California Healthy Kids Resource Center has information on wellness policy requirements, strategies for policy development, links to sample policies, and tools for evaluation.

  • Center for Ecoliteracy Model Wellness Policy Guide
    The Center for Ecoliteracy, in collaboration with Slow Food USA and the Chez Panisse Foundation, has created a Model Wellness Policy Guide with recommendations and language for developing a wellness policy. The guide is based on the innovative food policy developed by the Berkeley Unified School District.

  • The Food Trust Comprehensive School Nutrition Policy Initiative
    The Food Trust, a nonprofit organization that aims to increase access to affordable and nutritious food, has created a multidisciplinary school nutrition policy that is being piloted in several schools in the Philadelphia area. The Food Trust has also created a healthy beverage tool kit as part of its school food and beverage reform campaign.

  • National Alliance for Nutrition and Activity (NANA) Model School Wellness Policies
    These policies deal with nutrition and physical activity and meet the federal local school wellness policy requirement. The model policies are based on nutrition science, public health research, and existing practices.

  • American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) Media and Children
    AAP, a nonprofit organization of pediatricians, has information on how television viewing affects children as well as television viewing guidelines and suggestions for parents.

  • American Heart Association Limit Screen Time and Get Your Kids (and the Whole Family) Moving
    This website of the American Heart Association has suggestions for parents on reducing children’s television time and encouraging physical activity.

  • California Department of Health Services Do More, Watch Less
    Designed for after-school programs and organizations that serve children aged 10 to 14, the Do More, Watch Less tool kit aims to help kids reduce their screen time (watching TV, going online, playing video games) and increase their activity.

  • Canada’s Centre for Digital and Media Literacy Media Smarts
    A nonprofit organization that aims to empower kids to understand how media and advertising target them.

  • CommonSense Media Parent education and advice about children's media consumption.

  • Harvard Prevention Research Center Outsmarting the Smart Screens
    A parent’s guide to tools for reducing screen time at home.

  • Nemours Foundation KidsHealth: How TV Affects Your Child
    KidsHealth, a website created by the Nemours Foundation’s Center for Children’s Health Media, offers this article on how television affects children, including suggestions for teaching good habits.

  • We Can! (Ways to Enhance Children’s Activity and Nutrition) Reduce Screen Time
    A federal program that provides families and communities with resources for reducing screen time and staying healthy.

  • Harvard Prevention Research Center & YMCA of the USA Food & Fun After School
    A curriculum that develops healthy habits out of school time. Eleven teaching units help programs infuse healthy snacks and recipes, physically active games, and creative learning activities into regular program schedules.

  • Harvard Prevention Research Center Out-of-School Nutrition and Physical Activity Initiative (OSNAP)
    OSNAP works with out-of-school programs (such as before- and after-school programs and summer camps) to improve practices and polices related to nutrition and physical activity.