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Youth Compendium of Physical Activities: An Investigation


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For approximately 25 years, researchers have used the adult Compendium of Physical Activities as a standardized system to code the energy expenditure, or MET intensity, of adult physical activities. Until recently, those interested in studying youth often relied on the adult compendium and adult MET values as a proxy for youth values. However, the resting metabolic rate and activity energy expenditure is different in youth than in adults and can vary significantly across ages as youth mature physically and improve motor skills.

 

Produced in partnership with NCCOR (National Collaborative on Childhood Obesity Research), a new Journal of Physical Activity & Health supplement, titled “New Data for an Updated Youth Energy Expenditure Compendium,” seeks to directly inform the further development of a Youth Compendium of Physical Activities. Compiling a comprehensive and standardized list of the energy cost of youth activities will provide significant value to improve assessment of youth energy expenditure and help to develop intervention strategies to improve youth health and reduce childhood obesity.

 

Join Dr. Stephen Herrmann and Dr. Karin Pfeiffer, co-editors of the JPAH supplement, to learn more about the history of the Adult and Youth Compendiums, and the future of the Youth Compendium of Physical Activities. The editors highlight specifics in the supplement from a content perspective, important methodology considerations for these studies and future research, and results from the supplement and what this adds to the overall goal.

 

This free webinar, Youth Compendium of Physical Activities: An Investigation, took place on Thursday, July 21st, 2016. 

Dr. Stephen Herrmann is the Director of Program Development & Training for Profile by Sanford. Dr. Herrmann completed his undergraduate studies at Minnesota State University, Mankato, and received his master’s degree from the University of Northern Iowa. In addition, he earned his PhD in Physical Activity, Nutrition & Wellness from Arizona State University followed by a postdoctoral fellowship in weight management from the Cardiovascular Research Institutes Center for Physical Activity and Weight Management at the University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City, KS.

 

Dr. Karin Pfeiffer is an assistant professor of kinesiology and is involved with the Center for Physical Activity and Health. She is an exercise physiologist with an interest in population-based research. Her research focus is physical activity in children and adolescents, and her expertise is in the area of measurement of physical activity. In addition, she studies school-based and family-based physical activity interventions.